Early Detection and Treatment Saved My Life

By Jim Myers, Transplant Recipient and Kidney Advocacy Committee advocate

My name is James Myers and I’m a polycystic kidney disease (PKD) patient.  PKD is an inherited form of chronic kidney disease where liquid filled cysts form on one’s kidneys.  Most often it leads to high blood pressure, abdominal pain, and then kidney failure.

Myers, Jim

I was diagnosed at the age of 25, almost 40 years ago.  PKD runs in my family.  I’ve lost five members of my family to PKD, including my Dad.  When he passed away in 1983, I was tested.  On a simple x-ray, they were able to detect the large cysts on both of my kidneys.  This came as a blow to me, then a young practicing attorney. I was referred to Indiana University Health in Indianapolis.  They put me on high blood pressure medication, on a renal diet, and took blood and urine from me every six months.

Because I was tested and treated early in my life, I was able to postpone having to be on dialysis for 23 years, until the age of 58.  My dialysis was also easier on me than many of my clinic-mates and I was transplanted in four years – shorter than the average time in Indiana.

The fact that I was diagnosed and treated early on in my life has made a huge difference! The fact that my family doctor knew to make a quick referral to a nephrologist made a huge difference.  Their team approach to my case saved my life.  This is what H.R. 3867 is all about. This legislation would help doctors detect kidney disease earlier, when something can be done to slow the progression of the disease and improve the lives of patients.

My case shows that the early detection and treatment of kidney disease can prolong and improve a kidney patient’s life.  I’m living proof of that.  Please support the early detection and treatment legislation proposed by the National Kidney Foundation by sending your legislators a letter asking that they become a co-sponsor. By getting Congress to pass this law, we can save many more lives!

About nkf _advocacy

The National Kidney Foundation's advocacy movement is for all people affected by CKD, transplant candidates and recipients, living and potential donors, donor families and caregivers. We empower, educate and encourage you to get involved on issues relating to CKD, donation and transplantation.
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3 Responses to Early Detection and Treatment Saved My Life

  1. claudia buitrago says:

    Mi estimado señor yo estoy tratando de comunicarme con muchos hospitales para mi donación de riñón en vivo .. me han estafado unas personas sin escrúpulos haciéndose pasar por médicos me pidieron un dinero para un supuesto registro y otro para una supuesta transferencia que me hacen por dicha donación…. es muy triste ya que yo estoy pasando por una situación económica muy triste me están echando de casa por falta de dinero para pagar la renta … me he ofrecido como donante por la compensación económica que me ofrecen supuestas personas, lastimosamente fueron ilusiones y mentiras … sigo insistiendo en donar mi riñon .. para solucionar mi situación económica… perdoneme mi sinceridad no puedo engañar y contarle la realidad y el por qué estoy donando mi riñón… vivo en Madrid España y este es mi número de teléfono 0034665351463 también me puedes escribir al whuasaap le agradezco mucho su atención..

    El 16 ene. 2018 19:55, Advocacy in Action escribió:
    nkf _advocacy posted: “By Jim Myers, Transplant Recipient and Kidney Advocacy Committee advocate My name is James Myers and I’m a polycystic kidney disease (PKD) patient. PKD is an inherited form of chronic kidney disease where liquid filled cysts form on one’s kidneys. Most”

  2. Pingback: Early Detection and Treatment Saved My Life | kidneystoriesblog

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